If you haven’t seen Tidying Up with Marie Kondo on Netflix, you’ve probably heard about it through friends or social media. The ultimate organizer, Kondo authored the book The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing. Her organizing tips revolutionize the way we approach decluttering our home so that we can live in a happy, minimalist space, feeling light and free.

Even though it isn’t officially spring cleaning season, it’s still the perfect time to put Kondo’s organizing tips into action. Read on to learn how to spring clean the Marie Kondo way.

Get Rid of Things That Don’t Bring You Joy

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Kondo says while you’re cleaning, you should determine whether the items you’re sorting through bring you joy. If they don’t, you shouldn’t hesitate to get rid of them. You’ll find it’s easier to decide what to keep and what not to keep by asking yourself this simple question: Does it bring me joy? If the answer is no, bye, bye!

Organize by Categories, Not Rooms

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According to Kondo, it’s actually easier to organize by category as opposed to by room. For example, if you own a lot of towels or pillows, regardless of whether they’re bathroom or kitchen towels, bedroom or living room pillows, tackle the entire category at once. So when you’re organizing pillows, gather up all the pillows in your home and start deciding which bring you joy and which don’t. This approach will help you identify any duplicates or items in that category that you simply don’t need.

Overcome Your Nostalgia

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Nostalgia is the biggest barrier to a clutter-free home. For instance, you might find it hard to part ways with that paper admission wristband from that great time you had at an amusement park with your friends. The tricky part about overcoming nostalgia as you clean your home is that you’re inclined to consider nostalgic items to be things that bring you joy. Kondo suggests finding ways to consolidate such items, such as in a scrapbook as opposed to a big memory box. Also, if you have more than one item linked to the same memory, pick one to keep and get rid of the rest. 

Become an Expert Folder

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Kondo says folding like a boss allows you to fit more clothes in your closet or dresser. Tightly folding your scarves, dresses, shirts, and pants, and then stacking them vertically, can make it so that you can fit 20 to 40 items where only 10 could fit before. 

Say “Bye Bye” to Paper

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Unless it’s something like your birth certificate or important tax documents, you can probably get rid of most paperwork in your home. With everything primarily online now, there’s really no need for a large filing cabinet taking up space in your home. 

Avoid Fancy Storage Systems

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You may be tempted to buy a nice chest or cool bookshelf to help you organize your stuff. Kondo says don’t do it! First clear your home of all items that don’t bring you joy to see what you have left over. You’ll probably find you don’t need those fancy storage systems at all when you’re done. 

Start from the Bare Bones

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Going through your clothes? Kondo says empty out your closets and dressers completely, starting with a clean slate. Doing so will make it easier to look at each item, determine whether it brings you joy, and put only your favorite things back into the space. 

Ask Yourself Why

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Last but not least, if you’re having trouble parting ways with some items, Kondo says to ask yourself the big question: why? According to Kondo, there three categories for the reasons we can’t let go of something: attachment to the past, fear of the future, or a combination of the two. Ask yourself which category the item falls into to help you better understand why you’re holding on to it. Doing so will make it easier to let go. 

Now you have a game plan for spring cleaning your home, Marie Kondo style.

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